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What are expectations for McCown?

Posted Nov 1, 2013

Larry discusses what the Bears expect from Josh McCown, how the Bears contend with Aaron Rodgers' three-step drops and if Devin Hester will play anything other than special teams.

Wondering about a player, a past game or another issue involving the Bears? Senior writer Larry Mayer answers a variety of email questions from fans on ChicagoBears.com.

What are the Bears' expectations for Josh McCown against the Packers?

From Vince H. on Twitter

Pretty much the same as they would be for Jay Cutler: Get the offense in plays that provide the best chance to be successful; get the ball out of his hands quickly; distribute it to playmakers such as Brandon Marshall, Alshon Jeffery, Martellus Bennett and Matt Forte; and throw to the open receiver without forcing it into coverage. The biggest difference between Josh McCown starting Monday night against the Packers and his last starts with the Bears in 2011 is that he's surrounded by a much better supporting cast, both up front on the line and at the skill positions. Asked what McCown most has going for him, coach Marc Trestman said: "The 10 guys around him. He doesn't have to carry the weight of this football team, nor does any guy. We talk about it all the time. He's just got to do his job and be efficient and take care of the football."

How do the Bears pressure Aaron Rodgers while still being able to cover his three-step routes?

From Al on Twitter

It's almost impossible to pressure Aaron Rodgers or any quarterback when he takes a three-step drop and throws the ball. The key is to disrupt the timing of the play by bumping the receiver off the line or jumping the route. Charles Tillman is particularly adept at jumping slant routes. The defensive linemen also need to get their hands up to bat down some of those quick throws.

Will the Bears ever use Devin Hester at another position such as cornerback or receiver?

From Drew on Twitter

Anything's possible, but Devin Hester will remain exclusively as a return specialist for the foreseeable future. He doesn't even practice with the offense, so I don't see him playing on that side of the ball. I think it's even less likely that he plays on defense. He hasn't done that since his rookie season with the Bears in 2006.

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