News

Print
RSS

Who is last Bears safety with 6+ picks?

Posted Mar 14, 2017

Senior writer Larry Mayer discusses the last Bears safety who had more interceptions than free agent-signee Quintin Demps had last year, if there are any players remaining from the Lovie Smith era and the possibility of the Bears trading down with the Saints.



Wondering about a player, a past game or another issue involving the Bears? Senior writer Larry Mayer answers a variety of email questions from fans on ChicagoBears.com.

When was the last time a Bears safety had six interceptions in a season like recently-signed veteran Quintin Demps had last year with the Texans?

Paul A.
Oswego, Illinois

The last Bears safety to register at least six interceptions in a season was Mark Carrier, who set an NFL rookie record and Bears single-season mark with 10 picks in 1990. Four Bears have had at least six interceptions since then, but they’ve all been cornerbacks. Donnell Woolford did it twice with seven in 1992 and six in 1996. The others are Nathan Vasher (eight in 2005), Zackary Bowman (six in 2009) and Tim Jennings (nine in 2012).

With Jay Cutler and Alshon Jeffery gone, does this completely close out the Lovie Smith era?

Darin
Grass Valley, California

Almost. With Jay Cutler and Alshon Jeffery no longer with the Bears, special-teams standout Sherrick McManis is the only player still on the roster from the Lovie Smith era. McManis was acquired by the Bears in a trade with the Houston Texans in exchange for fullback Tyler Clutts Aug. 31, 2012. Smith was fired following the 2012 season.

What are your thoughts on Ryan Pace using his New Orleans Saints connections to trade the Bears’ No. 3 pick to acquire the Saints’ No. 11 and 32 choices? Based on the value for pick scale, is there any chance this is possible? Having three picks in the top 36 would be fantastic.

Benny
Regina, Saskatchewan

Based on a chart I viewed online that assigns values to each pick in the draft, the Saints would probably have to throw in their third-round pick to make that happen. The No. 3 overall pick the Bears own is worth 2,200 points, while the Saints’ picks at No. 11 (1,250) and No. 32 (590) in the first round and No. 76 (210) in the third round equal 2,050 points. Even if the Bears like this hypothetical trade—and I have no idea if they do—the Saints (or any other team) would really have to want a certain player at No. 3 to pull the trigger. And I’m not sure if that will be the case.

Email your question to Larry

More Chalk Talk